Freeze Dried vs Dehydrated foods

What is the difference, why it matters and which to store.  I didn't know there was a difference for a long time!

What is the difference between freeze dried and dehydrated foods?

Awesome question!  Before I seriously started working on our “home store,”  I had no clue there was a difference!  But it turns out that there are a lot of differences and those differences turned out to be incredibly important to my family.  In fact, many of the problems I had with “food storage” were solved when I discovered freeze dried foods.  Suddenly “food storage” could be easily rotated in my everyday recipes!  I was excited.

I’ve learned a lot about dehydrated and freeze dried foods since then and I regularly hold cooking classes to teach others what I’ve learned.  During each and every cooking class I hold there are numerous people who use the words freeze dried and dehydrated interchangeably.  Based on that, I’m guessing there are a few of you….maybe lots of you….who are just like I was: surprised to find out there is a difference between freeze dried and dehydrated foods and curious about what the difference is.

The difference is actually pretty big!  And it is very important to understand the difference when building a home store for your family.  Over the last few years I have consulted with many people who have had to throw away thousands of dollars in unusable food because they invested in the wrong thing in the first place.  Don’t let that be you!

I have chosen to store nearly all freeze dried foods in our family’s “home store” due to their greater versatility, nutrition, better taste, and usability.  Use the chart below to determine what you feel would be best to store for your family:

Freeze Dried Dehydrated
Process The product is frozen, then placed under vacuum which allows the water in the product to vaporize without passing through the liquid state. About 98% of the water is removed. The product is heated and water is removed through evaporation. It is impossible to remove all the water. About 20%-50% of the water remains.
Shelf Life
Very long (20-30 years) because of the lack of water left. Shorter (1-8 years) because there is always some water left in the product.
Additives
Since there is no water left in the product, no additives at all are needed in single ingredient cans. For example, a can of peaches will have nothing but peaches in the can. When you start combining ingredients (as in freeze dried just add water meals), additives and preservatives are needed. Sugar, salt, or other preservatives are usually needed to maintain the shelf life because there is always some water left in the product.
Nutrition
Retains all nutrients. Thrive freeze dried produce is naturally ripened and then flash frozen within hours so it can actually contain even more nutrients than artificially ripened produce found at the grocery store. Many nutrients (up to 50%) are lost because of the heat applied during the dehydration process.
Color, Taste, Texture
When hydrated, the color, taste and texture are all very similar to the original product. Without hydration, product is dry and can easily be crushed to a powder. Most dehydrated foods look and taste different from the fresh product. (Beef Jerky vs Roast Beef or Raisins vs Grapes). They are pliable, stretchy or chewy.
Re-hydration
Very easy to re-hydrate in cold or hot water. When hydrated they are just like the fresh product would be after being frozen and thawed. Difficult to re-hydrate (try turning a raisin into a grape or Beef Jerky into Roast Beef). For products that can be re-hydrated it must be done with hot water and requires far more water than a freeze dried product. Since the water must be hot, re-hydration requires fuel (which would be precious in a true emergency situation).
Use in cooking / baking
Very easy to use in cooking and baking. Products are precooked and cut so all you do is add water. Little to no change in the end product vs using fresh ingredients. Some products can be used in cooking or baking, but because of the change in texture caused by dehydration, not with as much ease or the same quality results as with freeze dried products.
What Products
Almost anything can be freeze dried including Fruits, Vegetables, Meat, Cheese, Yogurt, even Ice cream! Mostly fruits and vegetables. Some meats.
Best Use
Hydrated in place of a fresh product in any recipe. Fruits and some veggies and even cheese are also fantastic as snacks. Snacking

Pictures:

A picture really does say a thousand words.  Here are a few pictures that say far more than I ever could about the difference between dehydrated and freeze dried foods.  Especially note the differences in color and texture!

Freeze Dried vs Dehydrated Beef Freeze dried vs dehydrated grapesFreeze Dried vs Dehydrated Pineapple

Cost

One question I often get is “What about the cost?”  Yes, you will sometimes (not always) pay more for freeze dried foods than for dehydrated.  But I have found that with their longer shelf life and because they are so much easier to use and rotate, freeze dried foods rarely go to waste.  You can use them in your family’s everyday recipes.  That translates into a lot of savings!  I found when we introduced freeze dried foods into my family’s diet, we actually started spending less due to us wasting so much less produce.  You can watch a video about Tammy who tracked her savings and found she was saving about 24%:

Plus, if you shop through a consultant (click here to do that), you are guaranteed the lowest prices on Thrive food.  Or, sign up for my newsletter and I will keep you informed of all the specials on Thrive freeze dried foods.  Stock up on what is on sale each month and never pay full price!  In addition, if you start a Q (read more about that here: What is This Thing Called the Q?), you will get extra discounts each month.

You can even take it one step further by sharing Thrive with friends by hosting or even consulting and earn Thrive for free!  It doesn’t get much cheaper than that!  In the four years I’ve been a consultant, I’ve earned about $100K in free food!

Comparing Freeze Dried to Canned

I know some people also consider canned foods for their food storage.  Well, canned is to dehydrated like dehydrated is to freeze dried.  Canned foods have lots of heat applied, few nutrients, lots of additives, and a very short shelf life (usually 1-3 years).  Personally, I avoid them whenever possible.

Comparing Freeze Dried to Grocery Store Produce:

Many people ask how freeze dried produce compares to the fresh produce they might buy at the grocery store.  This graphic should answer that:

Freeze Dried vs Grocery Store Produce1

Freeze Dried vs Grocery Store Produce2

So there you have it!  The difference between freeze dried, dehydrated, canned and “fresh” produce!  I’d love to hear your experience or answer any questions you have.  Just leave me a comment below!

Raisin picture from Christian Schnettelker

Jerky picture from Larry Jacobsen

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11 comments on “Freeze Dried vs Dehydrated foods

  1. Pingback: [BLOCKED BY STBV] Difference Between Dehydrated Food and Freeze Dried | Best Gun Concealment

  2. I would love to pin this post, but there is no image available to pin. Great information, though, thanks!

  3. Very helpful info! Thanks!

  4. Pingback: [BLOCKED BY STBV] Freeze-Dried vs. Dehydrated Food: How Both Need To Be Part of Your Emergency Food Supply - Modern Molly Mormon

  5. Kimberleigh on said:

    Is there a way to freeze dry our own at home?

    • I know some people claim to be able to Kimberleigh. But it is a pretty complicated and expensive process to do correctly. Those that do it at home typically use a different method than is done commercially and the results are more similar to dehydration.

  6. Anne T. on said:

    Just pinned your post on emergency supplies in your car.

  7. You have such valuable information to share. This post was extremely helpful to me – thank you for taking the time to outline this. I would love to reference this blog entry on my blog, are you ok with that?

    Thanks.

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